total

Complete amount of buy or sell interest, as opposed to having more behind it . Bloomberg Financial Dictionary
See: partial. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary

* * *

I. total to‧tal 1 [ˈtəʊtl ǁ ˈtoʊ-] adjective [only before a noun]
with everything added together:

• The total cost of the project is put at £450 million.

• a company with total sales of £12 billion last year

• His total income is around £40,000.

  [m0] II. total total 2 noun [countable]
the final number or amount of things when everything has been counted or added together:

• What does the total come to?

• We expect to raise a total of £3.6 million.

• The jobless total is steadily increasing.

  [m0] III. total total 3 verb totalled PTandPPX totalling PRESPARTX totaled PTandPPX totaling PRESPARTX [transitive]
to add up to a particular total:

• Last year their sales totalled £364 million.

• The company has debts totaling $7.9 million.

• In order to receive benefits your savings must total less than £6,000.

* * *

Ⅰ.
total UK US /ˈtəʊtəl/ noun
the amount or number that you get when several smaller amounts are added together: a total of $20/£1,000/€3m, etc. »

We calculated all costs to the company and came to a total of $5,500.

»

We employ 534 staff in total.

»

We have a large workforce with women representing 30% of the total.

See also GRAND TOTAL(Cf. grand total), RUNNING TOTAL(Cf. ↑running total), SUBTOTAL(Cf. ↑subtotal), SUM TOTAL(Cf. ↑sum total)
Ⅱ.
total UK US /ˈtəʊtəl/ adjective
[before noun] including everything in a calculation or every person in a group: total cost/expense »

These figures show the total cost of the project including staff salaries.

total gains/losses »

Can you give us an idea of our total losses?

»

The UK All Companies performance category averaged an 18.1% total return over the year.

»

Women represent a very small percentage of our total workforce.

complete or very great: »

The project was a total disaster.

»

The audience listened in total silence.

Ⅲ.
total UK US /ˈtəʊtəl/ verb [T]
(UK -ll, US -l-) to add up to a particular amount: »

The annual salary bill totals more than $3 million.

»

They incurred losses totalling over $2 million.

(also total up) to add up amounts to get a final number: »

All costs have been totaled at the bottom of the column.

»

When they totalled up their losses, they realised they could not continue in business.

INFORMAL to destroy a car in an accident: »

They will pay the full cost to buy a new car if you total your car within the first year.


Financial and business terms. 2012.

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